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One of those days…

Yesterday I had one of those crappy crystalline moments when I realised I not only did not have my keys with me, but I’d left my Oyster card at home too. I managed to get to Angel for an evening of dance – albeit spending more money than is usually required – where I treated a housemate to my spare ticket, and she of course had house keys. Today though, I’ve left my phone at work – it’s pathetic memory week apparently – but I’m convinced I’ll live without it for 15 hours.

It does remind me though of my shitty experience sans purse and sans Oyster, when I cried on the tube thinking I was in an invisible Cas World bubble.

sliding-doors

On The Line: Crisis on the London Tube

Thinking back to this, I’m curious: why do we  assume that, because we live in a big, busy city we’re automatically faceless and invisible to the people that surround us?

Yes, they are strangers, but that doesn’t make them people any less. I think it says a lot that Londoners tend to expect almost a complete disconnection to other Londoners in public places.

Click the link in the title to read my article on Aliljoy.com

Première of Renaud Wiser’s Metropolis

On the 9th December, after a glass or two of wine with colleagues, I hurried my way from work to RichMix, a venue I had never been to before. Although it’s not a major venue for dance, it’s got some interesting dance and theatre pieces there every so often, and seems to me a pretty dynamic place, with a lot of music, cinema and exhibitions.

Awaiting the arrival of a friend in the lobby, I met Donald Hutera, who reviews dance for the Times, and had conducted the post-show discussion at the previous event I had reviewed, only a few days before. I sidled up to him and spoke briefly to him about the previous event. He forgot my name almost immediately, so I gave him my card. My friend and I ended up sitting next to him, right at the front of the audience, close to the action. As ever I scribbled away in the dark of the black box space, and more in the interval, at which point we noticed several of the Rambert dancers, there to support Renaud Wiser. It was an informal and very interesting evening.  There was a visible network of dancers, choreographers and artists of other capacities – a certain crowd I was just outside of and wish so to join. That’s quite an incentive I suppose.

Metropolis (Dancers: Aaron Vickers and Lisa Welham)
Metropolis (Dancers: Aaron Vickers and Lisa Welham)

Renaud Wiser has the weight of Rambert behind him

Budding young choreographer Renaud Wiser presents two dynamic, experimental pieces, his choreography bearing the hallmark of his dancing experience.An ex-Rambert dancer, Wiser is a founding member of the New Movement Collective and this evening’s presentation is supported by Free To Fall, an artists and producers development programme. These things enable – not define – Wiser and his work, which remains individual. There is a visceral, up-close-and-personal quality to these pieces which, in the small studio theatre of RichMix, make a vivid impression.

Click on the here to read the full review on Bachtrack.com

World première of Shobana Jeyasingh’s unique new Strange Blooms

 

Shobana Jeyasingh's Strange Blooms premiered in London © Chris Nash
Shobana Jeyasingh’s Strange Blooms premiered in London © Chris Nash

World première of Shobana Jeyasingh’s unique new Strange Blooms

Shobana Jeyasingh presents an evening of detailed precision in two highly unique works spanning a career of over 25 years. This double bill in Southbank Centre’s Queen Elizabeth Hall pairs a revival of Jeyasingh’s most prominent early work, Configurations, with the world première of her latest work, Strange Blooms. Although they differ vastly in aesthetics and movement style, both works demonstrate the meticulous detail and structural complexity of Jeyasingh’s work. The two commissioned scores lend extremely well to the choreography: music and movement are partnered very closely in these works.

The images of this newest creation are absolutely stunning. However, I can’t help but feel a little disappointed – having seen these images ahead of the performance – that the projections were not visible with such clarity during the piece itself.

Jeyasingh's unique new Strange Blooms © Chris Nash
Jeyasingh’s unique new Strange Blooms © Chris Nash

Please follow the link in the title to continue reading my review. All images are taken from Bachtrack Dance.

Dance photographer Joe Lambie

Dance photographer Joe Lambie

I am lucky enough to be working in a job I truly enjoy doing, and one of the coolest things I have got to do so far is phone other dance lovers around the world. I have now spoken to people in Hungary, Italy, New York, Ottawa, Seoul, Sao Paulo… the list goes on.

A few weeks ago, whilst in the midst of doing about twelve other things simultaneously, I picked up the phone at about 4.30 pm, and phoned through to a jovial sounding seventy-year-old man in Los Angeles, who just so happens to be a lover and photographer of dance. Joe Lambie was extremely generous and engaging in our brief half-hour chat across the pond, so I tried not to tamper with his words too much – I let his voice ring through, as much as is possible through the written word.

I really love the way Joe talks about trying to capture the ecstatic abandon that dancers experience when they dance. I can imagine in my every muscle, nerve and sinew what that feels like and I can often see it breaking loose on stage, yet Joe Lambie’s photos capture in a moment what is difficult to describe to any non-dancer. Just take a look and see for yourself!

Click the link in the title to read the article and view a select few of Joe’s brilliant photographs.

Dating Etiquette, period.

Dating Etiquette, period.

How many times have you heard a friend mention how grossed out they are by the idea of sex on menses?

Actually, how often does anyone even speak openly about ‘riding the crimson wave’? ‘Hardly ever’, do I hear you say?

If you're comfortable enough to get this close, can't you talk openly...?
If you’re comfortable enough to get this close, can’t you talk openly…?

What on earth is the etiquette with periods when dating? Are you supposed to “be indisposed” and hide from the world while you “can’t” have sex, or, if not, how do you say no without saying that you’re on, or seeming like you’re not interested?!

If you’re squeamish then this is a topic you would probably prefer not to discuss, but that’s why it’s SO IMPORTANT that you click on the link in the title to keep reading! 

This is my first post for communal blog, Aliljoy.com, established by an inspiring friend of mine, Yaz Vigus some years ago, and growing all the time.

BalletBoyz – The Talent demonstrate their unique group identity at Sadler’s Wells

Balletboyz - The Talent 2013 © Panayiotis Sinnos
Balletboyz – The Talent 2013 in Serpent © Panayiotis Sinnos

BalletBoyz – The Talent demonstrate their unique group identity at Sadler’s Wells

In a double bill at Sadler’s Wells, BalletBoyz demonstrate a group amity and common identity unlike any other company of their size. Founded by Michael Nunn and William Trevitt in 2000, the group has seen significant success across the UK and internationally, particularly in the USA. The dancers are very clearly ten individuals with unique skills and training but, as a company, the all-male ensemble displays a deep bond and a mutual language of movement. Their trust in each other has visible results.

The two pieces presented premièred together in January 2013 and the group has toured them as a pair since. Serpent by Liam Scarlett and Fallen by Russell Maliphant were both choreographed on BalletBoyz – The Talent, and both use the company’s strengths to breathtaking effect.

Balletboyz - The Talent 2013 in Fallen (ch: Maliphant) © Panayiotis Sinnos
Balletboyz – The Talent 2013 in Fallen (ch: Maliphant) © Panayiotis Sinnos

Follow the link in the title to continue reading.

This is my sixth review for Bachtrack, I have recently been appointed as the dance & ballet representative at Bachtrack.com.

Michael Clark Company leaves audience speechless

Harry Alexander by Jake Walters B 300dpi
Harry Alexander of Michael Clark Company © Jake Walters

Michael Clark Company leaves audience speechless

Unique, wacky and more than a little bit mad, Michael Clark’s triple bill at the Barbican will leave you speechless, if a little frazzled. Co-commissioned by the Barbican, the works Michael Clark Company present do not have individual names, but form three parts of a whole. This is an upgrade of the double bill Clark presented in Autumn 2012, which consisted of two diametrically opposed halves and has been likened to two sides of a vinyl record. The record analogy is extremely apt for describing Clark’s choreography: it’s astounding how closely music and movement are tied together in All Three at Once. This bold, unapologetic triple bill bombards the brain from all directions: I can safely say I have never before seen anything like it.

Follow the link in the title to continue reading.

This is my fifth dance review for Bachtrack, I have recently been appointed as the dance & ballet representative at Bachtrack.com.